Russia Culture Symbols

Symbols

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Total: 4 itemsDisplaying: 1 - 4 items
  • Cap of Monomachus

    The cap of Monomachus was part of the regalia of the grand princes and tsars of Russia. This was a golden crown trimmed with sable and decorated with precious stones and a cross. One legend claims tha...

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  • Double-Headed Eagle

    In 1497, Grand Prince Ivan III established the first official coat of arms of Russia. The prince regarded himself as the successor to the Byzantine emperors and adopted their emblem of a black double-...

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  • National Anthem

    The first Russian national anthem was written by composer Prince Alexander Lvov and poet Vasily Zhukovsky. Composed in December 1833, it began with the words “God save the Tsar.” In 1918, the Internat...

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  • Tsar Cannon

    In 1586, the foundry man Andrei Chokhov (Chekhov) cast the world’s largest cannon in Moscow. The barrel was 5.34 meters long, weighed an impressive forty tons and had an incredible calibre of 890 mill...

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Jeweller
Mikhail Tarasov
Jeweller, silversmith. Hallmark: MT. Born in the family of Yakov Tarasov (second half of 19th century). Owned a workshop in Moscow (1899–1917), which made silverware in the National Romantic and Art Nouveau
Rossica
Erbossyn Meldibekov
Erbossyn Meldibekov was born in the town of Tyulkubas in southern Kazakhstan in 1964. A sculptor, video artist and photographer, he studied at the Department of Monumental Sculpture at the Institute of Theatre and Art in Alma
Photographer
Alexander Khlebnikov
Photographer. Born in the family of Vladimir Khlebnikov in Novocherkassk (1897). Studied at the Boris Tchaikovsky School of Cinema in Moscow (1925), when he took up photography. Member of the Russian Photography Society (1926).
Romantic
Alexander Warnek
Painter, draughtsman, engraver, teacher. Son of Georg Dietrich Warnik, a furniture and cabinet maker from Danzig, who later changed his surname to Warnek (1833). Studied under Stepan Schukin and Dmitry Levitsky at the Imperial
Orthodoxy
Cenobitic
Monastic tradition that stresses community life. The monks live, eat and pray together, and there is no private property. Derived from the Greek words koinos (“common”) and bios